Vintage Tumblr Themes

zooophagous:

billibones:

cavalaxis:

Jim Phillips, 59, has been hunting shed antlers Montana public lands for the past 50 years. This Three Forks native’s phenomenal shed antler collection comprises some 14,500 sheds displayed from floor to ceiling—inside a 30 x 64-foot building he constructed specifically for its display. And, yes, he personally found every one.

dream house! i have plan:

le plan- befriend this man. get on this mans will. wait for him to die and take all the antlers.

Except a lot of these aren’t “sheds” they’re attached to the skullplate of the deer, there are even a few actual skulls in there I can see. I mean yeah it’s possible to find them naturally dead (or snag them from roadkill dumping sites) but they aren’t “shed antlers.” You don’t shed your skull the way you shed hair, unless you think a buck grows a new head every season.

neverending-fairytale:

Saw my all time favourite dress. Great opportunity to shoot some close-ups!


Forest Cottage, Germany.

Forest Cottage, Germany.

I’ve lost you, and at this point I hope you don’t come back.

apolkadotnerd:

survivide:

Tim Burton inspired stuff is always really neat.

DO Y OU KNOW HO W FUCKING BEAUTIFUL T HSE ARE

oncorhynchusdancing:

misuzus-fancy-goldfish:

Lilac demekin

holy shit. What a beautiful goldfish!

spookyloop:

"Born in Denmark 1978. I write and direct television shows for kids. I have a set of twins and not much time for anything. But when i have time i draw monster drawings on post-it notes… it is a little window into a different world, made on office supplies."
(x)

goldcumandrippedpants:

"I learned at a very young age how fragile life is. When I was 15 years old I found out I had a brain tumor. The doctors said I had a very small chance that I could outlive it. The only alternative was to get on a long waiting list for open face surgery in hopes of removing it. I guess the first blessing happened on my 16th birthday, when the surgery was scheduled. I found out shortly after waking from the surgery that they went into the palette of the roof of my mouth instead of opening up my entire face. I guess you could say that was the second blessing. But the real blessing was that I overcame it completely and I survived something that most people never live through. I was close to death and I escaped it, and now I celebrate life because of it. 

I wanted to be free. After this literal escape from death, I had some challenges at home and left at a very young age to spend my teenage years literally on the streets. I started with a hitchhiking tour all through Canada. Essentially I was homeless, sleeping on rooftops and under bridges and free. I met tons of interesting people, and experienced life to the fullest. Surviving the death sentence of a brain tumor was like defying death. I felt like the walking dead. I wasn’t supposed to be here. The doctors had told me there was no hope. But here I was, alive and breathing and being so free to live my life. When you live on the streets, you really appreciate just being alive. On the streets, you don’t have first or last names. So they started to call me Zombie, a person who is living but so close to death.”